Modelling

Conceptual Modeling

Conceptual modelling, also known as visualising, is an idea that only exists in mind or possibly on paper. It can help with:

Conceptual modelling can be complicated in the IA as it is hard to translate something in your head onto paper

 

Stage

Definition

Type

Definition

Tools

Graphical / Virtual Modelling

Graphical modelling is a visualisation of the idea in either 2d or 3d design.

Sketching 

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A rough and quick visualisation such as a diagram, or a rendered sketch.

Graphical - pen on paper with the aid of tracing materials. 1,2 or 3 points perspective or Isometric perspective.

or/and

Virtual (Digital) - CAD software on a computer like Solidworks and Fusion 360. In working drawings, it is critical to include dimensions.

Formal drawing

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Detailed visualisation such as a flow chart, technical drawing. It must be to scale. 

Virtual (2D, 3D)

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The approximate representation used to communicate design. 

Part, assembly and exploded drawings

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Display of the different parts and how they come together. This can come in the form of a working drawing.

Physical

Physical modelling is a physical representation of the visualisation

Scale

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Smaller or larger physical model

From simple foam board and glue to using proper manufacturing techniques

Aesthetic

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The model used to assess the visual appeal

Mock-up

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Full-scale model, used for tests and analysis

Prototype

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Final mock-up, before production

Virtual Modelling

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

 

Physical Modeling

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

 

Virtual Prototyping - Computer-Aided Design (CAD)

Advantages:

Disadvantages:

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Digital Humans: Motion Capture and virtual reality

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Ranges of fidelity and context

The combination of the fidelity and context help designers develop concepts towards a final prototype.

Range of Fidelity

Description

Range of Context

Definition

Low

Conceptual representation - conceptual drawing - sketch - Not really tangible - the user can offer input into the design idea (Like a CAD model)

Restricted

Testing in a controlled environment (specific design brief)

Medium

Representation of aspects - formal picture - blueprints, mock-up

General

Trial with any user in any environment (less strict design brief)

High

As close as possible to the final product - prototype - allows full user interaction for testing

Partial

Testing with the final user (target audience) or environment

 

Total

Testing with the final user and environment

 

Computer-Aided Design (CAD)

Representation of the model

Term

Definition

Example

Surface

Digital aesthetic model made for the assessment of the exterior's visual appeal

A render of the facade of a building

Solid

Digital physical (size, volume ex.) representation of the final product

3D model of the shape

Data

A model containing all the data (structured data) and the fine details

Digital blueprints

 

Virtual prototyping

In 2019 CAD modelling can simulate products in different ranges of contexts (environments) to help enable better design.

Bottom-up vs Top-down strategy

Bottom-up modelling consists of multiple parts (geometries) that come together to create the product

Top-down modelling

consists of one component (geometry), creating the product in one body/shape

Digital Humans

Computer-based models of humans that contain various mechanical and biological properties and therefore allow designers to predict how a human body would react to a situation and environment. It will enable testing dangerous settings like car crashes without harming real humans.

Advantages



Editors

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